CCDF Administrator Login

Home

1
2
3
4
5
6
Chapter 1: Federal Contacts image FEDERAL CONTACTS

Chapter one provides an overview of the Office of Child Care (OCC) and contact information for OCC, OCC regional offices, and CCDF grantees. It also provides a map of the ACF regions and definitions for frequently used terms and acronyms.

Read More >>

Chapter 2: About CCDF image ABOUT CCDF

Chapter two provides an overview of the CCDF key statutory and regulatory provisions, CCDF funding distribution and allocation formulas, including obligation and liquidation requirements, and the CCDF matching funds requirements.

Read More >>

Chapter 3: Nuts & Bolts image NUTS & BOLTS

Chapter three provides an overview of the CCDF biennial plan process, and highlights CCDF reporting (e.g., financial reporting, child care data reporting, and error rate reporting) and monitoring requirements. It also highlights some of the Lead Agency responsibilities.

Read More >>

Chapter 4: Implementing CCDF image IMPLEMENTING CCDF

Chapter four discusses eligibility criteria, program integrity, and service options (e.g., certificates, contracts, parental choice, rates, family fees, and collaboration). It also provides an overview of health and safety standards, quality activities, emergency preparedness, CCDF fund restrictions, and CCDF tribal requirements.

Read More >>

Chapter 5: Technical Assistance image TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Chapter five provides an overview of the technical assistance (TA) offered to CCDF grantees and lists the TA partners available through the Child Care Technical Assistance Network (CCTAN).

Read More >>

Chapter 6: Research image RESEARCH

Chapter six discusses the importance of using research to draft child care policies that support positive outcomes and provides an overview of the research efforts implemented by the ACF Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE).

Read More >>

previous next

HOW MANY CHILDREN ARE SERVED IN CCDF?

how many children served
The CCDF program provides funds to States, Territories, and Tribes to assist low-income families, families receiving temporary public assistance, and those transitioning from public assistance in obtaining child care so they can work or attend education/training programs. In FY 2011, CCDF served an average of 1.6 million children per month:
  • 28 percent birth through 3-year olds;
  • 29 percent three through 4-year olds; and
  • 43 percent five through 13-year olds.

WHAT'S NEW IN OCC POLICY?

The Office of Child Care recently published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) regarding potential future changes to CCDF. This rule would provide the first comprehensive update of CCDF regulations in 15 years. The proposed rule contains four priority areas: improving health and safety; improving the quality of child care; establishing family-friendly policies; and strengthening program integrity. The public comment period is complete, and a Final Rule has not yet been published. For more information, visit http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/occ/child-care-rule.
occ policy image

SUCCESS STORY

Family-Friendly Subsidy Policies in New Hampshire

New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) takes the goal of family-friendly child care policies seriously. They have made a concerted effort to simplify policy, enhance family friendly-processes, and reduce errors. Notable family-friendly changes in policy and administration include:

  • extending redeterminations to 12 months for CCDF-only families;
  • extending education/training from 2 years of continuous study to 2 years in a lifetime;
  • simplifying income calculations;
  • strengthening rules for temporary interruptions in approved activities;
  • eliminating the requirement to document residency over previous two years;
  • employing a “best estimate” approach on income similar to SNAP;
  • changing services authorization and payment rules; and
  • increasing notifications to families.